Organization now definitely puts line on E3 game show

Organization now definitely puts line on E3 game show

There was a time when the E3 game show was by far the most important gaming moment of the year. It was there that various developers and publishers announced their big games and that way you knew a little about what was coming.

In 2020, the E3 game show was dropped. That was because of the corona pandemic, which prevented major events from going ahead. And in 2021, there was a digital release, which really wasn’t that interesting. And for this year, nothing is coming out at all.

No E3 game show in 2022

Through an email, the ESA organization is said to have informed interested parties that E3 game fair for 2022 will not take place. Earlier this year it was already known that it would be too early to organize a physical event. But now it has become clear that a digital version is off the table. And actually that is a good thing. If you look purely at what the digital event offered, it was not much. It was mainly the press conferences around that week that were interesting. There is a good chance that these events will still come. Microsoft previously announced that it would be holding a press conference around the event. It can still do that now, without having anything to do with E3. However, the organization of Summer Game Fest to pitch right away their event, which takes place in June and may be an alternative.

Twitter won’t load because you didn’t give permission.

Excited to share that @SummerGameFest will return this June with a slate of events. We’ll be producing another Kickoff Live show with announcements, news and first looks.

Much more to share in the coming weeks, along with some very cool new elements for ’22. pic.twitter.com/jjXLG8Xueh

– Geoff Keighley (@geoffkeighley) March 31, 2022

Future uncertain

By the way, the ESA is not done with the E3 game show yet. The company wants to return in 2023 with a traditional physical event. Whether that will happen remains to be seen. In recent years, several publishers have found that they can tell their story in their own way and thus no longer really need such a large event that is mainly intended for professionals. Nintendo, for example, has their own Nintendo Direct, Sony their State of Play and also Electronic Arts and Ubisoft do their own thing. Whether they feel like giving the ESA a pile of money to have a booth at a game fair is questionable.

In that respect, the future of gaming events seems to lie mostly with consumer events rather than E3. That is much more interesting for game parties. For example, the organizations of the Gamescom and the Tokyo Game Show plan to continue their events this year.